Even the ny Jets are moving closer to naming their next head coach, while the very first round of interviews is over — or so it appears. The next step is to figure out which candidate can lead the franchise outside of the Todd Bowles abyss and return it .

Big career, big decision.

As of Wednesday morning, the hunt appears wideopen. Let us take a look at a professional and con for each candidate:

Mike McCarthy — He is the most powerful choice because he has the best résumé definitely. The former Green Bay Packers trainer is thinking about just one team — the Jets, according to ESPN’s Adam Schefter — though it appears that they’re the only team thinking about him. The biggest concern with McCarthy is that his offense had become too stale in the past few years. Before I’d hire him, I’d want to understand how he plans to refresh his philosophy.

Adam Gase — Could they really hire a fellow also-ran from the AFC East? The optics wouldn’t be fine, and the fan base wouldn’t be joyful. The former Miami Dolphins trainer is coming off a 7-9 season with a point (minus-114) which was worse compared to the of those 4-12 Jets (minus-108). Beyond that, Gase has several qualities that are attractive. He is an offensive playcaller and knows quarterbacks, that appeals to the Jets.

Matt Rhule — his name will not go away, that leads me to believe he is greatly in this item. The Baylor trainer is a sales man who believes in tough, disciplined teams. He revitalized Baylor and Temple, but it is a long way from Waco, Texas, to Broadway. The success speed for faculty coaches at the NFL is low. Moreover, Rhule isn’t called an offensive innovator and does not have a history of creating quarterbacks. In addition, you need to wonder whether he’d be able to construct a strong staff. Nonetheless, the Jets are intrigued.

Todd Monken — The former Tampa Bay Buccaneers offensive planner is a competitive playcaller who’d energize Sam Darnold and the offense. Working with journeyman Ryan Fitzpatrick and turnover-prone Jameis Winston, Monken supposed the NFL’s No. 1 passing attack. But it wasn’t that his offense; he ran Dirk Koetter’s strategy. That’s a questionmark. Monken has strong leadership characteristics — he had been the runnerup for the Packers project — but his low profile could lead to the rejoicing to shy away. Clearly which shouldn’t matter, but teams like to move the needle.

He also made the playoffs as being a head trainer for 2 teams — Indianapolis Colts and Detroit Lions — and he is famous for his work with quarterbacks. Do you presume Matthew Stafford misses him in Detroit? One problem is that Caldwell, out of football this past 12 months, is the ultimate re-tread and he is 63 years old. His game-management skills are a matter.

Eric Bieniemy — There hasn’t been a great deal of buzz regarding the Kansas City Chiefs‘ offensive coordinator, who was the very first to interview for that project. He has done a great job this season with Patrick Mahomes and the whole offense, but there are some people who believe he is a one-year wonder.

Kris Richard — When this were 2015, when the Jets last hired a trainer, he’d be a strong candidate. Much like the rest of the league, the Jets are looking for an offensive-minded coach. Richard, the Dallas Cowboys‘ defensive backs coach/passing-game planner, is defense all the way.