WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — Major League Baseball will install pitch clocks for Grapefruit and Cactus League games ahead of a potential implementation through the 2019 regularseason, Commissioner Rob Manfred told colleagues at Grapefruit League Media Day on Sunday.

The clocks, which have been used since 2015, will be phased within this spring in order to allow umpires and players to get comfortable with this system. Manfred said MLB will announces facts about the structure of that rollout this week.

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — Major League Baseball will install pitch clocks for Grapefruit and Cactus League games ahead of a potential implementation through the 2019 regularseason, Commissioner Rob Manfred told colleagues at Grapefruit League Media Day on Sunday.

The clocks, which have been used since 2015, will be phased within this spring in order to allow umpires and players to get comfortable with this system. Manfred said MLB will announces facts about the structure of that rollout this week.

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The point, Manfred said, will be to”start planning for the chance that we’re likely to utilize the pitch clock Opening Day.”

This may occur if the MLB Players Association agrees to this proposition, or if MLB chooses to use its collectively bargained right to implement it. Under this Collective Bargaining Agreement’s principles, the Commissioner has the right to inflict rule changes whether the MLBPA has been awarded annually of note.

A pitch clock was originally proposed meaning that Manfred could have inflicted a pitch clock without MLBPA approval last year. As an alternative, the league and the Players Association decided to make other pace-of-play changes instead — including as a limit on mound visits — with all the thought that a pitch clock can be redeemed later on. On Sunday, the Commissioner said he’s not yet decided whether he’d unilaterally impose a pitch clock.

Manfred confirmed that there aren’t any different rule changes planned for Spring Training. Other proposed initiatives cannot be enforced without the permission of the MLBPA for the 2019 season. That hasn’t happened.

Manfred added that while discussions about limiting or banning shifts stay ongoing, there aren’t any present plans to govern how teams align their defenders.

“It is controversial internally in that some folks believe if we simply eliminated the shift, we could sort of baseball back to a pure condition,” Manfred said. “Other people think that eliminating the shift is very likely to have consequences which are unforeseeable for us. It will divide our group a little bit with regards to whether or not they’re in favor of regulating or removing the shifts.”