After James Botham signed his first senior contract with Cardiff Blues on Wednesday, he became the 3rd generation of his family to engage in expert sport.

The former Wales Under-20s international’s dad, Liam Botham, also played rugby union – on the wing for Cardiff RFC, the Blues’ predecessors – as well as rugby league for clubs such as Leeds Rhinos, having started his athletic career as a cricketer with Hampshire.

Playing with three sports is striking, but Liam is not even the most well-known athlete in his loved ones.

This accolade belongs to his dad and James’ grandfather, the England cricket legend Sir Ian Botham, who for good measure, also found the time to play basketball football for Scunthorpe United during his career among the world’s best cricketers.

The Bothams are a rare strain in sport – a family with three generations playing with an elite level – but, since some of the examples below reveal, they are not the only kinds.

The Alonsos

George Headley batting against England

Cricket is a sport with a lot more than its reasonable share of family dynasties, but the Headleys would be the only real family to offer three generations of Evaluation players.

The first was Panama-born George, who transferred to Jamaica aged 10 and earned the nickname’the black Bradman’ because he had been considered as the first great batsman to emerge out of the Caribbean.

He scored 176 on his Test debut for the West Indies against England in 1930 and, in a livelihood by the warfare, scored 10 centuries in just 2-2 Tests in an average of 60.

His son, Ron, was a talented batsman, but not on the identical scale because his dad, spending nearly all his career playing cricket for Worcestershire before earning two Test caps for your West Indies at age 3-4.

With Ron and his family depended in Worcestershire, his son Dean left his name as a quick bowler in England, setting himself with Kent before acting 15 Tests and 13 oneday Internationals to get England.

The Matthews

Paolo Maldini

Cesare Maldini was a towering figure of Italian football, a defender who won four Serie A league names and a European Cup with Milan.

He also won 14 caps for Italy before focusing on a managerial career which saw him responsible for Milan and the German national team.

Despite all those credentials, however, it’s his son Paolo who many individuals consider once the surname Maldini is cited.

Equally accomplished at left back or centre back, Paolo was an influential figure in several Milan sides, helping the Rossoneri triumph Serie A titles and five European allies.

A one-club man who spent 2 4 famous years as a Milan player, Paolo holds the Serie A list for most looks with 647 and won 126 caps for Italy, reaching the finals of the 1994 World Cup and Euro 2000.

Paolo’s son, Christian, did not make the grade in Milan, but remains playing professionally for Fano in Italy’s third tier.

And there could be another Maldini on the spectacle so on, with Paolo’s other boy, 17-year-old Daniel, earning glowing reviews because he progresses through the youth ranks at Milan.

Would you imagine about additional non-natural athletic families? Submit your ideas from the comments department.

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