Duke phenom Zion Williamson likely played his last college game Sunday, at a 68-67 loss to Michigan State in the Elite Eight of the NCAA tournament.

We’ve never seen that a prospect like Williamson, whose mixture of productivity, athleticism, competitiveness, skill and feel for your game makes him that the funniest favourite for its No. 1 pick in the 20-19 NBA draft. Combine this with his utter star power also it is easy to understand why no additional possibility is currently under consideration at the very best — no matter of which team wins the Zion lottery might 14.

Williamson could sit tight until draft nighttime following his inaugural season, because he’ll be under no obligation to demonstrate any such thing before he hears his name called by NBA commissioner Adam Silver shortly afterwards 7:30 p.m. ET on June 20. Deciding a broker will be his camp first line of business, although there’s a chance some one near your household gains certificate and negotiates his sneaker deal.

It’s highly unlikely Williamson is going to perform more than just a photo shoot at the centre of whatever team ends up with the No. 1 pick, because it’s his call if he wants to submit to a medical exam for NBA teams. Additionally, it is up in the air if we’ll see anything higher than a token appearance from Williamson at the NBA unite in May, outside perhaps some networking obligations.

Ostensibly, since Williamson is such a clear top pick, fans can ignore visiting him with a basketball in his hand before NBA summer league in Las Vegas in early July. — Jonathan Givony

Top 100 prospects


Who’s the best opportunity to draft Williamson?

Short response: The Ny Knicks, Phoenix Suns and Cleveland Cavaliers.

Longer answer: Lots of teams can convince themselves they will have some shot.

This could be the initial year with the new lottery rules, which makes it less probable that a league-worst team such as the Knicks lands the No. 1 pick — and a great deal more probable a team in the middle jumps upward.

Here are the newest chances for your 14 lottery slots compared to the old ones:

And with slightly more than five matches to choose every team, listed below will be the projected lottery chances, via ESPN’s Basketball Power Index.

These new chances are a big reason you never see teams freaking out about every triumph down the stretch costing them a chance at such a talented prospect. This is going to be a massive toss-up.


Is this unprecedented sneaker recruitment?

The very first rung on the ladder for Williamson’s emerging marketing profile will soon be landing a massive sneaker acceptance deal. His star power and volatile game are expected to set him one of the greatest annual earnings for rookies in history, right alongside the seven-year Nike prices that LeBron James signed $87 million and Kevin Durant signed for $60 million.

As many as six brands will turn to sign up including Nike, Adidas, Under Armour, New Balance, Puma and Anta. The expectation is that Williamson will sign his deal before the May 14 draft lottery, even when the draft order will be put.

“Within my life, I feel that it’s going to become the biggest bidding war ever done,” former sneaker executive Sonny Vaccaro stated. “I’d put them all on go.”

Vaccaro signed Michael Jordan in Nike at 1984 and later looked to offer James a $100 million contract in Adidas. Sources at multiple brands throughout the industry expect Williamson’s deal to maybe reach that astronomical amount.


Williamson might be your ideal prospect since…?

Back in FebruaryI introduced the question who was the latest college prospect we’d seen as promising mathematically as Williamson. According to my consensus NBA draft projections, that utilized both the player’s statistics translated to their NBA equivalent and at which in fact the ball player rankings in Givony’s top 100, I found only Anthony Davis at 2012 ahead of Williamson within my own database, which comprises top college prospects moving back as far as 2003.

At there, I theorized that Williamson could be able to pass Davis if he were competent to play at the exact same level over all Duke’s staying games. His first knee injury prevented that possibility, also because Williamson’s numbers had been down quite a small amount — notably on defense, at which he averaged just 1.8 steals and 1.0 blocks after returning as compared to 2.2 and 1.8 before his injury his depreciation dropped a little volume.