By Charles Brun: Two months after his 3rd round no contest against KO artist Julio Cesar Martinez, WBC flyweight champion Charlie Edwards announced on Friday that he’s vacating his title out of concern for his health.

The 26-year-old Edwards wrote to World Boxing Council president Mauricio Sulaiman, saying that it’s become too difficult for him to make the 112 pound weight limit for the division. As such, Edwards says he’ll be moving up to super flyweight [115] to go after the titles in that weight class.

Is Edwards fleeing from Martinez?

Some boxing fans believes that the light-hitting Edwards (15-1, 6 KOs) didn’t fancy the idea of having to fight the powerful KO artist Martinez (14-1, 11 KOs) ever again because he took a royal pounding from the 24-year-old Mexican talent before the fight ended round 3 on August 31 at the O2 Arena in London, England. If this is a move by Edwards to keep from belted around the ring by Martinez in the rematch, then it’s understandable.

In moving up to 115, Edwards won’t be any better off than he would be if he stayed at 112. To capture a world title at super flyweight, Edwards will need to beat one of these champs:

  • Juan Francisco Estrada – WBC
  • Khalid Yafai – WBA
  • Jerwin Ancajas – IBF
  • Kazuto Ioka – WBO

Edwards’ lack of power will be a problem at 115

One can only imagine what will happen with the light hitting Edwards when/if he shares the ring with Estrada or Ancajas. But if Edwards needs to fight his way to a mandatory position by going through Sriskaket Sor Rungvisai, it could be just as bad. Rungvisai is even more powerful than Julio Cesar Martinez. If Edwards thought he had it bad against Martinez, just imagine what it would be like with Rungvisai sharing the ring with him. It would be a nightmare.

The smart thing for Edwards to do is to move down to 108 rather than moving up to 115. The fighters are slightly weaker at 108, and his power, such as it is, would be better in that weight class than at 115. It’s not going to end well for Edwards if he moves up to super flyweight, because those guys are bigger, stronger and more talented than the current crop of fighters at flyweight.